Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Therapy hiatus

I graduated from therapy! For now, at least. I may go back at some point, possibly to someone with a different approach.

After a few months, I felt like the therapist was telling me the same things over and over again, and it was time to act on them. We talked about self-compassion, mindfulness of emotion, and in general keeping in mind what's really important to me (and what should be important to me, like taking care of myself) and living accordingly. 

One image that helped me was riding a wave -- knowing that if things are overwhelming (or if things are perfect), it will pass, and trying to go with it instead of struggling against it. I've been reading a book about mindfulness meditation, and it also talks about how we have a tendency to grasp on to happy moments and try to push away bad ones, and how instead we need to take things as they come and accept both the good and the bad as essential parts of life.

We also spent a few sessions talking about my childhood, and I left those feeling much lighter. I learned that my unhappy childhood had something in common with the unhappy parts of my Biglaw experience -- it's the mindfuck that's harder to deal with than what actually happened.

So, overall: big thumbs up for therapy. I will keep practicing all of the things I learned. And maybe I'll use the extra hour in my week to finally start piano lessons.

7 comments:

  1. I whole-heartedly approve of this post. And I love the idea of you taking piano lessons!!

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  2. How wonderful and exciting for you! Congrats on the graduation from therapy! And learning an instrument is awesome!

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  3. I've read your blog for years. Congrats on therapy :)

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    1. Thanks! I went and checked out your blog -- I see you were starting a solo practice about a year ago. I'd love to hear how it's going!

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  4. What book, and was this personal therapy and how did you approach it or what did you get out of it? I am considering it for some things that I need to work through...

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    1. The book is Self-Compassion by Kristin Neff. Yes, personal therapy. As I mentioned above, I went to someone with a meditation/mindfulness approach. I found it very valuable to be able to talk to someone objective who is trained in listening without judgment and challenging me to look at things from different perspectives. I felt like therapy illuminated things that it would have taken me years to figure out on my own. At the same time, I felt like in the end she just kept telling me to be mindful when I wanted to explore things in more depth, so I may go back to someone else with a more traditional approach.

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